my social dilemma

I talk a lot about the importance of intentional morning routines.  I think it is critical for a productive (and ultimately happy) day.  One of the things that I try to be intentional about is to “put some good” into my brain first thing in the morning.  I try to read thoughtful content, watch inspiring videos, etc.  And while I have a few sites I go to nearly every day (Seth Godin’s blog for example), I often to to Linkedin or Facebook to see what I can find.

This strategy has become increasingly challenging.

I recently watched a new Docu/Drama on Netflix called “The Social Dilemma.”  It’s really well done and I think everyone should watch it.  It provides some real world challenges with social media and why we need to be thoughtful about how we use it.  And while it was a bit depressing, I don’t think it was very surprising.  Most of us know that the platforms are driven by algorithms.  This piece just shines are light on the fact that these algorithms are working overtime to keep your attention…even if it’s not good for you.

But I would push back on one part of this movie.  They are not showing me what I want.

The movie spent a lot of time showing us how each platform is measuring everything we spend time on, like, comment on, and so forth.  Then, as it assesses what “we want to see,” it shows us more of that.  The thesis is, if it commands our attention then it can sell that attention to advertisers.  I get that.

That brings me back to my morning routine.

But each morning I get on Facebook to catch up and my friends and my world and I don’t like what I am seeing.  For example, I am dog tired of seeing political posts.  Seriously.  Yet, despite my best efforts to “hide posts” and even to “snooze” particular people for 30 days, more and more posts just like it keep showing up.  Every.  Single.  Day.

So either every single person in my social circle is posting constantly about the upcoming election, or the Facebook algorithm is getting it wrong.  Either way, I need to work to tweak my morning routine.  If Facebook (and the other platforms) are selling my attention, they might want to take notice.

They are losing mine.

Kirby Hasseman is the CEO of Hasseman Marketing, a full service marketing agency located in Ohio.  Learn more about Hasseman Marketing here.  

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